Imbolc 2015 P4 – Germination at Trefignath

Imbolc 2015 P4 – Germination at Trefignath

We have been to the interesting island of Anglesey many times. We have scoured the island for sacred sites on many occasions. We have spent literally days of time researching places to visit. Somehow, two startling omissions had occurred. Firstly, Kal had never seen the reconstructed chamber of Barlodiad Y Gawres. Secondly, we had never found the Trefignath monuments. We set both of this things right for Imbolc 2015. We’re not going to cover the reconstructed barrow of Barlodiad here. Let’s just say we visited it. It was cold and windy (as it always is) and there was nothing energetically significant about it. Let’s move on to the fun stuff! We were at the end of our Imbolc day. The trail of Arthur-related sites had reached the furthest tail of...

Imbolc 2015 P3 – Arthurs Flower

Imbolc 2015 P3 – Arthurs Flower

Having spent a lovely half hour at the church dedicated to Michael at the foot of the ridge known as Bwrdd Arthur (or “Arthur’s Table”) it was now time to find a way up onto the ridge. One of my objectives for this Imbolc was to connect more of the sites that I had identified as having a reference to Arthur, and which were part of a landscape zodiac that I was forming across Northern Wales and England. At a junction in the road near to a signpost we found the entrance to the ridge and followed the steepest path up on to the crest of the ridge. Kal soon found a comfortable spot in a shaft of sunlight, and I used my dowsing rods to locate one too. The sun at its peak now, and as warm as it was going to get! Adorning the Table It was close to lunch...

Cerrig Arthur and The Seven Sleepers

Cerrig Arthur and The Seven Sleepers

The road up to Cerrig Arthur stone circle is narrow and steep. It climbs sharply out of the town of Barmouth, winding at precarious angles until it settles into a straight line ascent above the seaside town. From houses through woods then out into open fields the road lifts you clear of the roar of the sea and replaces this with the howl of the wind across the valley which perches itself above the Afon Mawddach river mouth miles below. We parked at the entrance to a farm called “Sylfaen” – a reference to the sylvan woods, perhaps, or maybe to the presence of sylphs? Either way Kal noted it as an auspicious sign. This visit would be the third Arthur-related site this year so far, and it was only the middle of January. We had maps. We had the...